Why Taverns?

Why taverns? I posed this question in the foreword of the original version of Tangible Taverns: The Bull & The Bear. Taverns are where we got our start, five years ago. We were so proud of our work at the time, though reviewing it shows how inexperienced we were and how much we’ve grown since then.

The past five years have seen an improvement in every aspect of what we do. The writing is sharper and more concise. The art is more skillfully executed, and more of it is produced in-house. The maps look great. The layouts improve every release.

We couldn’t have believed five years ago that our humble little release would be the stepping stone for working with other publishers.

If you’ve noticed a slowdown of Dire Rugrat releases, it’s due to just that fact. If you like what we do, you may be interested to know that Kelly has done work for Kobold Press, Playground Adventures, Flaming Crab Games, and other third-party publishers of D&D 5e materials. I’ve worked with Rogue Genius Games and others.

But… back to the question. Why taverns?

The local watering hole is a representation of the community as a whole, whether that community is a neighbourhood in a larger city or a tiny hamlet. Adventurers can go to the tavern, figure out what the locals are like and what problems they have, solve those problems (or make new ones), and return to the taphouse to collect payment before moving on… or not. I’m certain entire RPG campaigns could be set in a tavern, just dealing with the drama created by all those visiting adventurers!

If you downloaded the latest Tangible Taverns: The Bull & The Bear because you received a notification of an updated version, thank you for your patronage these last five years. 

To those who are new to what Dire Rugrat does, welcome!

I’m excited to see what the next five years hold for us and our little company, and hope many of you reading this will come along for the ride. Regardless, put your feet up, pour yourself your favourite drink, and enjoy this little slice of our gaming reality.

We’re pleased to announce the anniversary edition of Tangible Taverns: The Bull & The Bear. These new files include more original artwork, a revised colour map, and additional stat blocks for 5e and Pathfinder.

Ken Pawlik, September 2020

 

Pick up Your Copy Today

Tangible Taverns: The Bull & The Bear (5e)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tangible Taverns: The Bull & The Bear (Pathfinder Compatible)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tangible Taverns: The Bull & The Bear (System Neutral)  

   

Travels in “Uncharted” Lands

So often we think of adventurers wandering vast swathes of unclaimed lands. They find somewhere to set their bedrolls, maybe a tent, and set watches for the night. If they are reasonable survivalists they might forage for berries or root vegetables, perhaps hunt some game or set snares.

Only, how much land is truly unclaimed?

Has the land long been home to a tribe of nomadic ogres? Is there a hill giant homestead? Is there a village some miles away where the local earl may not appreciate people poaching on the land? Perhaps the patch of berries the adventurer’s found is a food source a local farmer relies on to feed his family.

This blog series provides encounters for your PCs, and an opportunity for them to consider is uncharted land really uncharted?

Ogres in the Mountains

Some distance from a small village, a tribe of ogres has made their home. Four of these hulking giants live inside a vast cave tucked into the bottom of a mountain. Some people from the village have noticed them in the distance and worry about their own safety, and that of their fellows. The PCs are asked to venture forth, exterminate the foul beasts, and save the village.

Complications

A homestead some distance from the village has been relying on the hunting the ogres do.  The local wolf population had grown substantially and threatened the livelihood of the farmers.  Their sheep have fared much better in recent years as the ogres have been attacking the wolves. If the ogres are killed, the farmer and his family fear the wolf population will once again surge, and they and their sheep will be in danger.

The ogres, while quick to temper, are relatively peaceful. They mean the village no harm, and are trying to live symbiotically with the locals.

What’s in the Bag?

Ah, that moment when your players take down an NPC wealthy enough to possess a bag of holding. They want it to store their own goods, sure, but it didn’t come empty now, did it?

This series of posts detail the contents of such magical bags.


An Adventurer’s Bag of Holding

The bag is stained with smears of blood, dirt, and something that smells suspiciously of vomit. It has a sturdy set of ties strategically placed to allow the user to carry it like a backpack.

  • 26 loose crossbow bolts
  • An abacus
  • 7 bags worth of loose ball bearings
  • 3 baskets
  • A bell
  • 2 blankets (one has a squirrel embroidered on it)
  • A well illuminated book (The History of Wine: A Monk’s Tale), worth 15 gp to a collector
  • 18 chalk nubs
  • 3 costumes (1 courtier, 1 blacksmith, 1 naughty apothecary) all with appropriate cosmetics and costume jewellery
  • A flask (half filled with cinnamon scented whisky)
  • An hourglass
  • A vial of perfume worth 55 gp
  • A nightshirt
  • 6 pounds of soap
  • A waterskin filled with high quality wine
  • A cloak of billowing

Lord Alvin Cyris

old fashioned book with a house shield of a black elk on a green and white background

We are pleased to release Houses and Heraldry.

This book sketches out ten noble houses for your campaign. Each house is laid out on one page; the top half contains the house name, its motto, a representation of their heraldic device as it would appear on a shield, and an information block detailing important personages, numbers of troops, and vassal houses. The lower portion provides enough detail about the interesting characters of the house to get your imagination going, but leaves plenty of room for you to add your own details.

The younger son of Duke Cyris is getting ready to branch out on his own. The exclusive blog content below details his family, servants and vassal houses.

Pick up your copy today on DriveThruRPG.


House Cyris

Steady On, A Dragon’s Dawn

 

Lord of House: Lord Alvis Cyris

Spouse: Lady Julianna Cyris (formerly Houghton)

Children: Jarle (son), Raoul (son)

Household Knights, Retainers, Servants: Hal Wainwright (butler), Fiona Wainwright (head housekeeper)

Bannermen: 425 (300 infantry [50 immediately available]; 100 archers [10 immediately available]; 25 personal guard)

Vassal Houses: House Houghton

 

Lord Alvis Cyris is the younger son of Duke Azin Cyris. His title is technically a courtesy title, though he does hold a small parcel of land his father his given him in the family’s duchy. The younger Lord Cyris is quickly securing relationships with other noble houses, and solidifying ones with House Drekyn, the family his mother was born to. He has recently revealed his family crest, which is an amalgamation of his father’s banner with his mother’s.

Lord Alvis Cyris
Alvis is a canny young man who aspires to lead House Cyris upon his father’s death. With his wife Julianna’s support, Alvis is gaining favor and support from his family’s vassal houses, and nobles further afield. Alvis is an accomplished duellist, and has taught his wife how to defend herself. He has a tactical mind, and understands the politics of nobility well.

Lady Julianna Cyris
Lady Cyris was born into a family with strong ties to House Drekyn. When a marriage between her and a grandson of House Drekyn was suggested, her family eagerly accepted. Lady Cyris has been well taught in arts of manipulation and subterfuge, and is eager to see her family rise to great heights. She is working closely with her husband to manufacture a series of events that would see them inherit all of House Cyris.

Jarle Cyris
A short, stocky boy nearing ten years of age, Jarle is already being groomed as the future head of the house. He is often present at his father’s meetings, listening quietly. Afterward, his father quizzes him on what was discussed, ensuring his son pays attention to every detail. He understands how to use various weapons and trains with them each day. He is also very well educated, and is encouraged to spend at least an hour of each day reading books he borrows from his grandfather’s library.

Raoul Cyris
Slighter than his older brother, Raoul is a charming eight-year-old with a cheeky smile and large blue eyes. He is quickly becoming a capable swordsman. He despises his studies, which causes them to drag on longer than he or his tutor wish them to.

Hal and Fiona Wainwright
A serious faced couple in their younger years, Hal and Fiona work as the heads of staff for Lord and Lady Cyris. Hal is the son of Herbert Wainwright, House Drekyn’s dedicated and loyal butler. While he worked for some time at the Drekyn estate, Duchess Gunnilda Cyris requested he relocate from her old family home and become the butler for her youngest son. He was honoured to do so, and arrived with his wife. The two have no children, and have been unable to conceive any. They are loyal to Lord and Lady Cyris, but also to Duchess Gunnilda Cyris and House Drekyn.

 

Pick up your copy of Houses and Heraldry for 5e on DriveThruRPG.

If you don’t think you want the five 5e stat blocks, there is also a system neutral version.

Download a PDF copy of the above. 

inkwell and feather pen

August 2020 Reviews

In case you missed some of our products the first go around, or you’ve been sitting on the fence about them, we’ll compile the monthly reviews of our products into one blog post each month. The full reviews can be found with the products (linked to in the product name), and in some cases, on the reviewer’s own blog (linked to the reviewers name). Continue reading August 2020 Reviews