Adventures In Wonderland (1-4)

Last October our family started this fun series of children’s adventures. We had an ESL student we had hosted some time ago visiting for a few days, and it seemed like a great activity we could all enjoy.  We shared a review of Adventures in Wonderland #1: Chasing the White Rabbit at that time, and the kids loved it. So much so Kelly ran the second adventure the same night with only a quick scan of the PDF before playing. The third was played the next day.

Then a long time passed. Our former student returned to Japan. The kids begged and begged to find out what happened to the white rabbit. We played another fun kids adventure. And eventually a new chapter in the AIW series came out.

With Rugrat #3 old enough to not be napping, but young enough she can’t quite grasp everything that’s going on, we set her up as Kelly’s animal companion. She sat on Kelly’s lap, rolling her own set of dice randomly and chiming in to repeat what people said.

“Perfect summer day.”

Chasing the White Rabbit

Adventures in Wonderland #1

It had been a long time since we’d played, so we presented the rugrats with the idea of starting over. Rugrat #1 wasn’t too sure about it; he wanted to move on to the next part. We asked if he wanted a friend to come join us, and pointed out his friend might want to start at the beginning, and so it was agreed.

For those of you who aren’t familiar with the series, it starts like this: “On a lazy, do-nothing day the relaxed cloud-gazing of a group of young adventurers is interrupted by the mysterious appearance of a strange, teleporting white rabbit. What follows might be the oddest game of tag ever played, as the adventurers chase the white rabbit through a peculiar and colorful wood only to run afoul of an angry tree.”

This initial part is run much like a board game, introducing kids to their character sheets by way of skill challenges. Once players reach the end of the path they face off against the large tree, giving everyone a chance to test out their combat skills.

This first adventure is a great primer to games in general, not just roleplaying games. It gets the players used to rolling dice and moving their miniature across a board that is not unlike the board used to play Snakes and Ladders. Along the way, they will be introduced to Pathfinder RPG game terms, such as saving throw, attack roll, and skill check, as well as being introduced to the game’s central mechanic.

The rugrats remembered this from last time, and our 5-year-old barbarian grinned as he got the final blow (again).

When we finished this adventure, we asked the kids to summarize what happened.

Friend: “We landed on magic things.”

Rugrat #2: “I landed on a paw!”

Rugrat #1: “The tree picked up the rabbit.”

Down the Rabbit Hole

Adventures in Wonderland #2

“After chasing a white rabbit through the wood, a group of young adventurers find themselves falling down a peculiar rabbit hole! Can they puzzle their way out of the hole by feeding a hungry dictionary and playing the oddest game of peek-a-boo ever?”

Words for the Dictionary

Kelly and the kids were sucked in the rabbit hole and Rugrat #1’s friend looked a bit nervous. Then he asked if he could tie the rope in his inventory to an arrow, and attach that to the wall in case they started to fall. As written, there is no real threat here, but it was inspiring to see the problem-solving in action, so we had him roll it up. He looked so pleased when he succeeded.

And so we began the dictionary challenge. Friend recognized the weasel song the dictionary sings right away and bobbed his head along to the song. Rugrat #3 just continued to repeat what I said about the book.

Rugrat #3: “It flies out! It looks crazy.”

Rugrat #1, who loves to read, enjoyed this challenge immensely, and even Rugrat #2 confidently chimed in with a few words.

The part with the potion and the cake was a little more troublesome for the kids. Our rugrats have been lectured extensively to never consume anything that isn’t food and that we didn’t give them (there were a few too many cases of them chewing their nails, biting lego, and licking shopping cart handles). It took a bit of urging, and Kelly going first, for the kids to try the consumables, but in the end they did, and through the door they went, into the next adventure.

The second adventure is really fun and reinforces the idea that the players can use their imagination and their wits to overcome challenges. Clever players can likely make their way through this adventure never needing to roll dice. The module is also tame enough that even the most sensitive person will have no problem playing through it.

We don’t want to spoil all the surprises in this adventure, but once again we asked the kids for a summary of the journey so far.

Rugrat #1: “We met the diary!”

Friend: “We met the Peek-A-Boo!”

Rugrat #2: “We saw the book.”

 

The Dodo’s Race

Adventures in Wonderland #3

The third adventure has the players run the Dodo’s obstacle course. There are dragonflies, representing tally marks, following the characters around; anytime they were addressed, I had them respond by saying their names were all Mark. Rugrat #1 loves puns, and the idea of the dragonflies being called “Mark” was hilarious to him. When I said there were pictures of large dragonflies on the ground where they were meant to stand, and that their names were “Mark” as well, he looked amused.  When they started saying “Hey, I’m Mark” too, he broke into hysterics.

Honestly, this whole adventure had the kids in stitches once they figured out what was going on. At first the dodo’s strange way of speaking and constant misuse of words confused the kids, but once they figured it out, they just kept giggling.

Adventures in Wonderland #3: The Dodo’s Race has the PCs face off against some gelatinous blobs.  When we played the adventure the first time (in late 2016), Kelly made Jello jigglers; this time she opted for a bag of candy. The small pieces of coloured sugar stood in well for the opponents on the battle board, and the kids were able to eat them once the foe was defeated.  Needless to say, this was a hit with the kids.

By this point in the adventure path, the kids had the hang of some of the common RPG terminology and the dice, including which one was used for which purpose.

Kelly: “Roll your initiative.”

Rugrat #2: “Or your d20, whatever you want to call it!”

Rugrat #1 and his friend both wanted to heal Rugrat #2 when he got hurt. They started asking around the table who had the best heal and were super concerned, but thrilled they won the prize chest from the Dodo.

Friend: “Is the chest full of gummies?”

 

And this adventure’s summary?

Rugrat #1: “Hey, I’m Mark!”

Friend: “We wanted to eat jello. We saw jellyfish.”

The Dodo’s Race is another good installment in this series. It promotes team play, and reinforces that each character is going to have strengths and weaknesses, and that we work together to deal with situations as they arise. It also does a good job of giving the players choices. At no point are they forced to combat the various jellys, but they will make the subsequent tasks easier if they do. It’s a great mini-module for young players.

 

Message for the Duchess

Adventures in Wonderland #4This was new for the Rugrats, and for us, which brings us to the biggest disappointment of this series – it takes forever to be released. There is amazing art, fantastic maps, and a great story, but the huge gaps in release dates makes it difficult to keep the momentum going in any campaign, but especially one with kids.

The players made their way into the duchess’ home and eventually found their way to the ball pit where they were set upon by the snake-like baby mimics, who seemed to come out of nowhere.

Rugrat#2: “So it’s camouflaged in the balls?”

We rolled up initiative again, each time easier than the last as the kids were getting the hang of where to find the information. Rugrat #1 remained the best at adding the necessary numbers, but with a little encouragement, he gave his friend a chance to work on his own arithmetic helping out only when he or Rugrat #2 got stuck.

Friend: “I use snake attack! Snake attack! Oh wait, that’s sneak attack.”

We used the candies from the third adventure to represent the baby mimics, and once again, the kids were thrilled to defeat them. When the first one was destroyed (aka: eaten), the kids all chimed in saying it would be a great idea if each of them defeated a snake (and ate the corresponding candy). The thoughtfulness of that admittedly surprised Kelly and me who expected them to just fight over the candy. It also worked out really well that each child did take out their own snake, with a little help from Mama Witch who used a sleep hex on each of them. There was, of course, a bag of candy just in case the barbarian took out more than just his share.

We were running short on time at this point, so I truncated the search through some small tunnels and moved everyone along to the final encounter of the module (skipping the mirror ray encounter), which Rugrat #1 crushed due to his knowledge of the colours of the rainbow. The players then discovered the Duchess’ message around the neck of a cute stuffed bear. The bear is intended to be given to the characters as a reward, but the Duchess decided against giving it to them, since they opened her message without permission… whereupon the roguish friend decided to steal it from the narcoleptic woman, reasoning that it was okay because the game is just pretend. The party then moved on in the direction that the Duchess told them she saw the white rabbit move in, and the game ended.

A Message for the Duchess is a fun little mini-dungeon for new players to romp through. None of the challenges is too much for clever players.

What was your favorite part of the whole adventure?

Rugrat #2 & Friend: “Eating the gummies!”

Rugrat #3: “The bunny!”

Rugrat #1: “Hello, I’m Mark!”

I would highly recommend these adventures for new players. The way they gently increase the learning curve is excellent, acclimating the players to each mechanic as its introduced. On the whole, the only negative aspect of this mini campaign is that the modules are coming out slowly, and that the kids ask daily when the next one will be released.

What’s your favorite thing about playing Pathfinder?

Rugrat #2: “Being a character and all the stuff you can do, like sneaking!”

Rugrat #1: “The funny parts in the story, and the voices.”

 

Do you play any RPGs with kids in your life?

Have you checked out the Playground Adventures line of products before?

Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

doorway to another time

Way of the Worlds – A Design Journal

Last week I detailed my thoughts about Paizo’s new Starfinder Roleplaying Game. While the game itself is competent, if uninspiring to me, Kelly and I decided to use it to run a new campaign, partly in order to test the game out and see how well some ideas we have for products might fit. It may not be my favourite game, but hey, if you want to earn a few credits, you sell material for the systems that people will buy products for, right?

Here we go again…

Instead of taking the easy road and running straight from pre-existing material, Kelly suggested running a game inspired by a show she’s devoured on Netflix: Outlander. This is nothing new; Kelly works from home and occasionally the television is on in the background while she goes about her business.

If you aren’t aware of the premise, Outlander is about a young, married nurse who travels from 1945 Scotland to 1743 Scotland where she meets and falls in love with another man. The show is beautifully filmed, and is full of drama, intrigue, brief bouts of vicious brutality, and, of course, romance. It is well worth watching, if you are looking for something in the vein of A Game of Thrones with 100% more men in kilts and 80% fewer naked young women standing/writhing/being… seductive(?), during expository scenes.

But wait, there’s more!

While Outlander is a great place to start, I don’t want the game to primarily take place in the past with only framing sequences and flashbacks in the present. So looking at other stranger in a strange land tropes, I have taken inspiration from the DC Comics character Adam Strange, particularly the Adam Strange: Planet Heist miniseries by Andy Diggle and Pascual Ferry as well as, to a lesser extent, the Adam Strange: Man of Two Worlds (which I believe is just called Adam Strange in its original mini-series release) story by Richard Bruning and the Kubert brothers. Adam Strange also led back to his sword and planet forebears, John Carter (of Mars!) and Carson (Napier) of Venus, both created by Edgar Rice Burroughs of course. As an aside, I’ve always preferred Carson to John Carter.

What do we do now?

So, now we have our premise of a young, affianced diplomat (yes, she is an envoy; our frustrations with this class are pretty well tested) who randomly travels from 317AG to 4717AD Korvosa on Golarion where she will meet another appealing young man who is completely different in temperament from her fiancé. Plenty here to create romance and drama, right? But what will the characters do? Where’s the adventure?

Here I look to pre-published material. While the first Starfinder adventure path is far from complete, I can look to the description of the adventures that comprise it, and adapt from those plot to literally collapse the Pact System via a weapon of mass destruction (called the Stellar Degenerator in the AP, but which I have renamed the Maw of Rovagug for… reasons). From here I have sketched out a solar system spanning series of events, full of action and tense negotiations.

starfarer's companion coverWhile in Korvosa, I am adapting the mostly fantastic Curse of the Crimson Throne adventure path to the Starfinder system (with a little help from the Starfarer’s Companion by Rogue Genius Games). There’s a lot of drama already baked into this adventure path, and set in a pre-Victorian England and France inspired Korvosa, with sharp divides between social classes and plenty of unrest, it is already proving to be exciting! Having the two adventures running concurrently also allows me to move the action from one setting to the other when Curse of the Crimson Throne hits a portion Kelly is less likely to enjoy (namely anything involving a dungeon), or when there is extended travel through the Pact System.

What’s your inspiration?

I really enjoy adapting material that I enjoy into game material, and the rewards thus far have been immense. This has been a great campaign so far, with a lot of drama, and possibly some hard choices looming. It feels a lot like Outlander by way of Battlestar Galactica.

Does it sound appealing to you?

What material have you adapted for gaming, successfully or not?

What material do you think is ripe for adaptation?

Tell us about your experiences in the comments below!

broken car

Help, I’m Alive! – Deadworld Design Journal 1

As with so many things, this all started with Kelly telling me she had watched something she really enjoyed. In this instance it was Van Helsing, a television series that details the activities of a mysteriously badass woman who kills vampires in a post-apocalyptic world. She then had me watch it as we worked in the evenings after the rugrats had nested for the night. I liked it well enough. As Kelly suspected, it gave me a few ideas I could translate into RPGs.

She then started watching Z Nation, which she really got excited about, so, once again, I started watching it with her (she kindly allowed me to start at the beginning). I was leary at first.

I’ve watched The Walking Dead to the end of the seventh season. I read the first hundred issues of the comic book. I stopped both because I found them wearying. Their relentless bleakness made me wonder why any of the principal characters wanted to survive aside from sheer masochism. I liked Z Nation more than TWD (or Van Helsing for that matter). It was cheesy, had some bad acting and questionable production values, but its bones were good. And the scenarios and ideas in play seemed like someone had translated their zombie apocalypse gaming sessions into an awesome series of short B movies. In short, its makers remembered that sometimes its okay to be fun or silly, even in the midst of death.

Shortly after I started watching Z Nation, Kelly asked if I wanted to change campaigns while we were on vacation; switch from our Supernatural inspired modern occult investigation campaign to one set in the zombie apocalypse. Sure, I said, thinking that this would be a short term thing. I should have known better….

Location Matters

I didn’t have a lot of time to prepare, so I lightly sketched out zombified North America. The best zombie entertainment, in my opinion, begin in the aftermath of whatever apocalyptic event brought the world to its knees, so I decided to set our game four years after Z-Day. Our game would start in Virginia, at the University of Virginia per Kelly’s character’s background. A portion of the University has been turned into a secure compound under a chauvinistically tyrannical thumb. The rest of the campus is kept free of the dead and other riffraff by the compound’s soldiers, who also make scavenging forays into other less friendly territories. Women, children, and the elderly take care of the compound itself, ensuring that it runs smoothly and that the soldiers are comfortable.

Beyond the compound’s environs, the US is a patchwork of disparate factions vying for limited resources. The larger a community was, the harder it was hit on Z-Day, so there is marginally more safety from the dead in the less populated regions of the country.  Much of Kansas is controlled by a charismatic clergyman and his chosen Redeemers. There is a roughly triangular region anchored by Chicago, Springfield, and Indianapolis where the sun no longer rises. Locals of this area have taken to calling it Neverlight, outsiders merely say that it is Always Dark and avoid the area. It is rumored that there are… things… in the dark. Texas is reputed to be free of the dead and is ruthlessly controlled by four Oil Barons. The waters have reclaimed southern Louisiana; New Orleans is now generally known as The Sunken City. There are points of light as well: the southern tip of Vancouver Island has been walled off and is free of the dead, if rumours are true, though one must endure eight weeks of solitary quarantine if they are to join Utopia, as it is called by the desperate. There are other safe zones out there, somewhere.

Alert Status Red

Being set in the zombie post-apocalypse, zombies will of course be well represented. Regular, lurching zombies, fast zombies, plague spewing zombies… they’re all in there. People with their myriad array of abilities and allegiances of course will likely pose the biggest threat, ultimately. But there needs to be more… Taking a page from Resident Evil and Resident Evil 3, tyrant and nemesis-like undead menaces will present themselves from time to time.

The dead are comprised of more than just zombies as well. As described above, there is a region that never sees daylight. What kind of undead creatures could thrive in such a place? I can think of one or two.. or perhaps more. And… and this is my favourite part… there are ghouls. Yes. Ghouls. What is terrifying to people inured to the horror of the zombie apocalypse? Dead things that are social, intelligent, and ever-hungry for living flesh are. The ghouls, and their queen, have plans. And while they would love to see the population of humans increase, it would certainly be to the detriment of the general quality of life…

The End is Here

I think that is enough to chew on for the time being. Next time, I will discuss the system, resources used, and some house rules that have been implemented to better simulate the system’s implementation of the theme.

Comment below!

What have I missed? What kind of things would you like to see in your zombie apocalypse? Sound off in the comments.

Two bees on a flower

A Buzz on Spring Break – “For The Hive” Play Account

Ah spring break. A glorious time full of fun and excitement and a break from the monotony of every day life.

And as a work from home mother of three small children with no child care, it is also a really long two weeks where I struggle immensely trying to juggle work  and rugrats intent on getting up to no good (I believe it was day two that Rugrat #2 shoved half a dozen smurfs into the baseboard heater while I was showering).

Gardening, baking, colouring pictures, and Pokémon Go can go a long way, but Ken and I decided spring break was also the perfect time to break out another RPG adventure for the kids. We agreed it was time to play For the Hive, a really well reviewed adventure written by J Gray and published by Playground Adventures.  I thought it could be fun to add a fourth player to our game, and I suggested we try bringing another child into the mix. So a couple of weeks ago I called the mother of Rugrat #1’s best friend.

It was an awkward call because I have never broached the topic of RPGs with other parents. “So, uh, hi Parent! Do you have a minute? I wanted to talk to you about something.” Immediately I realized it sounded bad, like her child had done something wrong.  She was driving, using her car’s speaker phone, so there was also that awkward bit where you feel like you have to talk extra loudly while introducing role playing games to someone when you can’t even see their face to gauge their reaction.  She’s awesome though, so with the promise of letting her look over the adventure before we played it, she said it was a go.

Time to Game

A week and a half later, the first Saturday of Spring Break, was the big day.  Rugrat #1 & #2 were bouncing off the walls with the impending arrival of Friend 1, who arrived grinning ear to ear.  Getting the game started proved a bit tricky. We had gone ahead and premade the characters for the kids, guessing what type best suited Friend 1. The sheets were bang on, but the lure of the pawns, tokens, and visible map were strong. The kids kept trying to play them like a board game and had trouble listening. Eventually, with food in their bellies, Rugrat #3 safely in her crib for a nap, and pawns and character sheets sorted out, we began.

for the hive coverHere is where I jump in and say that if you want to read a review of For the Hive, you can find Ken’s here.  There are also some reviews with the product here.

Really Time To Game

With everything set, the adventure began.  Ken adjusted it slightly, setting it at a nearby library we like to visit, but as written, the adventure makes it easy for players to become invested – who doesn’t want to help a friend, and save a bee hive while they are at it?

Friend 1 sat quietly and super still, listening intently as the story unfolded.  Rugrat #1, who is seven next month, squirmed and wiggled, which is typical for him.  The key things Bzzercup had to say could have been stressed better to the kids (the Rugrats had trouble focusing), but that was not the adventure, it was our kids and the delivery of those facts – a good reminder not all kids focus as well as Friend 1! GMs playing with kids for the first time: remember your audience! 

Rugrat #1, who is an anxious child, had a lot of difficulty with the idea of shrinking in size, even when we stressed it was just pretend.  With some convincing from Friend 1, he reluctantly agreed, and we were are able to set off across the grass to the hive.  Here the beautiful map came into the play.  The kids loved this map, and we had to run off to print a few extras (how hard sharing can be).

One of the big things I noticed running this adventure for kids is how much (at least mine) needed to be reminded we were doing this together, that we were a team, and that we all had to help each other.  It’s a hard thing to learn – accepting you won’t excel at everything, but that what you may not be able to accomplish someone else on your team can.

A great example was the magical looking glass lost in the huge expanse of grass.  Rugrat #1 was super upset he couldn’t activate it, but I pointed out that without him we wouldn’t have even known what is was or what it could do. Teamwork let us jump forward across the lawn (but downside – he didn’t get to come across the praying mantis he saw in a piece of art, and there was a bit of an upset about that).

So How’d They Do?

Simply put? They succeeded in the goal of the adventure.  And not all groups do.  There were some hurdles though.

One major thing Rugrat #1 had trouble with is things not going his way.  This is a fun little educational adventure, but (much like any other RPG session) the joy gets sucked out a bit when a player throws a tantrum and storms out of the room because his dice aren’t rolling well. After being given the chance to calm down, Rugrat #1 did rejoin the party, and he was just in time for the big final show down.

Rugrat #2 remained quiet for most of the adventure, chiming in during combat to grin and yell “I hit it!” (naturally we made him a barbarian). He was feeling a bit under the weather and lounged across his chair, with his feet on me, or sat on my lap for most of the adventure.  When Ken and I game we sit in the basement on a big day bed with a table nearby.  It’s super comfortable. It’s also a space that would have kids bouncing all of the place and playing with pillows.  Be sure to find a space the kids can focus, but everyone can be comfy – sitting on our hard wooden IKEA chairs for a couple of hours with a four-year’s bony bum wiggling around wasn’t exactly ideal.

Over the course of the adventure, Friend 1 would randomly grin and exclaim “This is so much fun!”, making the afternoon so much better. He was the wild card for us as we’ve played with the Rugrats on a few occasions, and I must say he was a delight.  (There may have been mumblings afterward of sending Rugrat #1 to his house next time and having Friend 1 come by and game on his own.)

Final Thoughts

Rugrat #1 and his friend told us they had completed a unit on bees in school, and knew most of the bee facts that were shared during the adventure, but Ken and I found them interesting. I would recommend that anyone GMing to the younger crowd makes a point of these facts. It is really easy for them to get lost in the excitement of the adventure, and they are pretty interesting (plus a great educational take away).

Rugrat #1 hates conflict. And not being awesome. Obviously these are serious hurdles with Pathfinder.  On more than one occasion he stormed off, hiding in his room. I’m not sure there’s a great way to avoid this if you have a similar child in your life, but reminding him (or her) ahead of time about teamwork is a good idea.  This adventure also did a great job of not having the players “kill” anything.  Opponents were paper wasps.  Wasps actually made of paper (and it was a great tie-in to a previous PGA adventure).  This meant instead of killing a living thing, characters destroyed or ripped the paper, defeating the paper wasp – a very nice touch for children who are sensitive or otherwise upset by violence. I think this made it easier for Rugrat #1, and Rugrat #2’s favorite thing was “ripping the paper wasps.”

All in all, the Rugrats and Friend 1 had fun with this adventure, and both older kids said their favorite thing was helping the queen bee, but it seems Adventures in Wonderland is still the reigning favorite, and the Rugrats are eager for more of that soon. (More on that later!)

Scared

… and I Feel Fine – An Actual Play Account

A while ago I wrote a review for The End of the World: Zombie Apocalypse by Fantasy Flight Games. I liked what I read, and was eager to get a couple sessions of the game in, which happened around Hallowe’en. The following is an account of the first session.

Once the players had settled, we had a brief discussion of their characters, particularly their traits and what they meant. I chose to skip the voting portion of character creation and just go with each player’s depiction of themselves. Then I set the stage for them.

It was game night, all of the spouses and children were conveniently elsewhere, everyone was settled in with their beverage of choice. People in town had been getting sick and the news was reporting increasingly common incidences of violence. There frequently were the faint sounds of sirens in the distance. Then everyone heard a crash in the air, then the sound of an aircraft falling toward the ground, followed by a bone rattling crash and a small explosion.

They rushed out to find that two of the commuter seaplanes whose flightpaths pass over my house had crashed, one falling into my neighbour’s home, destroying it, the other hitting the road in front of my house, destroying most of the parked cars (including most of theirs), and then rolling in a fiery mass into the house across from mine.

Everyone jumped into action, splitting into two groups: one heading to the neighbour, the other going across the street where they could hear screaming and a baby crying.

I went across the street, but stopped at the wreckage; I saw something moving in it… a person! I jumped into action, called my friends and offered help to the injured man.

Then I died.

Fierce fighter

We saw little of this….

The infected tore my throat out with the requisite arterial spray and looks of disbelief and dawning horror from the other players.  Things got real after that. Taking down this single infected took the combined efforts of the entire group, as it likely would in real life if five regular guys pushing forty had to take care of things. One of the characters got bitten… and infected in the fracas. Not that he knew it yet.

Scared

…but plenty of this.

After taking the infected down, they got the woman and her baby from across the street and retreated to my house to ransack it for all it was worth. The sounds of disaster carried on all night; fire could be seen toward the city. A plan was made to get to one of the character’s parents’ boat and take it to one of the outlying islands where another character’s parents’ had a cabin.

Then morning came and I kicked out the other crutch: the people killed by the infected were rising as zombies.

I had risen as a zombie.

There was a brief discussion, and it was decided that they would do their best to avoid me, rather than crush my skull. It was heartwarming.

The group rushed out to the one vehicle that had been parked far enough from my house to avoid being destroyed…  thankfully it was <NAME WITHHELD>’s minivan. Everyone piled in and drove up onto the railroad tracks next to my house. They wondered at the lack of people out and about, the absence of people fleeing from the city, but decided to stick to the plan and headed away from downtown.

They made it a few kilometres, until coming to a pair of unmoving cars blocking a rail trestle that crosses the highway. The highway below was packed with unmoving vehicles with some visible infected rampaging among them and a few zombies waving in the breeze.  Unnoticed by the infected, the group checked the cars out; one was empty, the other had a vacant-eyed zombie in the driver’s seat and a rabid looking infected in the passenger’s seat.

Seeing the PCs, the infected went berserk, and the guys knew they had to take it out before the infected on the highway heard it and came swarming up the steep slope to the trestle. Two of them moved the empty car with some difficulty… it was out of gas… and the others moved into position to deal with the other car.

The zombie was dispatched without too much difficulty, but the infected managed to sound the car’s horn, which made the baby cry. With the full attention of the infected below now on them (and quickly making their way toward the slope), the van driver decided it was time to take matters into his own hands and sped toward the car on the trestle. Seeing this, the two PCs dealing with the empty car sent it careening down the slope, taking out a couple infected in its descent.

The van hit the car, and slowly pushed it down the tracks, until it finally knocked it clear when the tracks turned. The PCs all climbed back aboard in the process and gritted their teeth as the infected reached the moving vehicle and began to batter it with their bodies. The van sped up after knocking the obstacle clear, leaving the infected behind.

I had each player then narrate a descriptive scene describing something they saw from the van, or something they were feeling based on their experiences thus far. Then they arrived at their destination with the boat in the driveway… and the driver was nearly shot by his stepfather. The misunderstanding was resolved, and everyone assembled readied themselves for a boat journey as we ended for the night.

I had a lot of fun running The End of the World: Zombie Apocalypse, and the players enjoyed playing as themselves. So… what will happen next? Will we uncover the cause of this sudden and drastic change in reality? Will the PCs make it off the island? What will the world’s response be? How widespread is the event? What happens if <NAME WITHHELD> succumbs to his infection on the boat? Will the secrets of Quarantine Zone 4 ever be uncovered? Hopefully we get another session in soon so we can find out!