Sewing with Kids – Dice Bags

Another day of not-homeschooling.

It turns out the Wonderful Pigs of Jillian Jiggs were trickier than I thought, so we took a break and dialed it back.

We have to walk before we run.

Transmogrification Class

Today we turned the bottom part of some pant legs into bags for dice.

I opted to do it this way so I didn’t have to pull out my sewing machine. We have a real love-hate relationship. And I swear it can sense my mood. As my patience wears thin the feeder doesn’t work properly, the spool catches and I end up with a big old mess. 

Cut the fabric to a bag size

I just sort of winged this. Mostly I looked where the rips were in an old pair of toddler jeans I had and cut the line below that. You should do whatever size works for you.

old pants cut down to sew a dice bag

Sew the bottom together

You could swap the order of this and sewing on the button. It doesn’t really matter. 

I ran my thread along a wax block I have to make the thread a bit stronger. Then I got the stitching started for Rugrat #1, who I set to work with a simple stitch.

I did the work for Rugrat #2 and Rugrat #3, and then I went over Rugrat#1’s work. He had done a great job, but I knew if by chance it broke, or a hole was too big, he’d be upset. 

Rugrat#1 stitching the bottom of his dice bag

Sew on a button

I let the kids sort through a few jars and bags of buttons I have. I picked up a big bag of mixed buttons from the dollar store a few years back. They were cheap and varied. I meant to use them for scrapbook, but with three kids I just never had time. I also picked up a bag of pink buttons last week for pig noses. And we have this collection of jars of buttons I inherited from my nana. 

They had a great time going through and picking the right button for them.

I started each of them off, and I secured the button on the bag. Then I set them to work going over what I did to make it more secure, and to get them familiar with how to stitch on a button.

Rugrat#1 stitching a button on his dice bag

Rugrat #1 hated it. He hates buttons. I don’t think he actually owns a single thing with a button on it. 

“What would you do if a button fell off your shirt?”

“I’d never own a shirt with a button,” he said.

“What would you do if you had kids one day and the button fell off their shirt?”

“I’d throw it away,” he said. 

I know people who do just that, but I figure, sewing a button back onto a shirt is far less work than having to hunt down a new shirt at the store. And it’s a great skill to have. So I made him do it anyway.

Rugrat#3 trying to thread a needle while sewing

Rugrat#3 surprised me the most with this part of the project. She has some trouble with her needle coming unthreaded. I offered to help, but she insisted she try threading it herself. She patiently tried over and over. And she did it! 

When Rugrat#2 pulled the needle too hard while working on his project, she even managed to thread his needle!

Add something to secure it with

Rugrat #3 loves rainbows. And sparkly things. So I found a few pieces of embroidery thread and braided them together with her. We secured the braided string around the button. Now when she wants to close it, she just wraps it around the bag, and then the button.

Rugrat #1 and Rugrat #2 both opted for how I originally thought I’d do it, stitching a single piece of embroidery thread around the top of the bag, making a drawstring. The two ends can then be pulled and wrapped around the button. 

Children's dice bags

Finished!

And now the kids have run off to roll their dice and see what the sums add up to.  I’m calling this a win!

 

Finished children's dice bag project