flawed rose

Flawed Foe: Glando the Pervasive

Some NPCs make excellent allies, others are debilitating nemeses, but some are just sad. In this series of posts we bring you Flawed Foes.  These NPCs may once have held great potential, alas, their flaws have created substantial hurdles.  Don’t let that stop you from enjoying some good old role-playing fun though!


Publisher's Choice Quality Stock Art ©Rick Hershey/Fat Goblin Games

Publisher’s Choice Quality Stock Art ©Rick Hershey/Fat Goblin Games (https://fatgoblingames.com/)

Glando the Pervasive was born to a charming catwoman and a hardworking catman.  The young catfolk adored his parents, who worked tirelessly to provide their son with a good life, and remained jubilantly positive no matter what hurdles came their way. While Glando was cheerful and generally well-mannered, others in the village found it difficult to trust him; there was something about the young catfolk that seemed shifty.

Over time Glando’s parents began to drift apart, and though they did their best to keep their son’s well-being first and foremost, a change was eventually needed; Glando’s father no longer agreed with the rules of his clan, and decided to leave the village, but his mother refused to give up the life she had built.   As he neared adulthood, Glando was forced to make a choice – leave with his father, or stay with his mother.

The young boy was devastated.  As it happened, a travelling show came through his village that night.  Several of the visitors were adept musicians, sporting various instruments including the lute.  Glando was mesmerised.  The music spoke to him and soothed him.

Overwhelmed with the decision before him, Glando returned home where he collected a few belongings and, in the first rays of dawn, hid himself in amongst the wagons of the travellers.  It was not until much later that day he was found and, after some pleading, was allowed to stay on with the musicians.  The group wasn’t sure if they could trust him and kept their small coin purses close, but they sympathized with the young Glando and his desire to be on the road, his heart full of melody.

Each evening the party would create beautiful music and occasionally they allowed Glando to try.  He was horrible, but he persevered.  His companions offered words of encouragement and attempted to teach him.

For months he travelled with the musicians, from town to town.  He assisted them with their packs and instruments, he helped draw crowds, and always he dreamed of being one of them, but he was never allowed to play with them for events.

Glando soon decided they were jealous of his ability to play the lute, and when the party left town the next morning he bid them farewell and ventured off on his own with the small pouch of coin he had been paid during his time with them.  The aspiring bard made his way to a local merchant who was selling a lute. The lute, he was told, belonged to a capable and magnificent musician who met his end performing in front of a great crowd well into old age – no doubt, it could bring him the same fortune and luck.  And so, with nary a coin left to his name, Glando renamed himself Glando the Pervasive and set forth to conquer the musical scene of every tavern he could find.

Alas, after a year on the road Glando the Pervasive has had difficulty securing any shows and is frequently booed off stage. Due to his squirrely nature, Glando has not even had much luck hiring himself out to adventurers or merchants to provide a helping hand.  He has begun to consider returning home to his village, but he isn’t sure what he will find if he does, and he fears neither of his parents will forgive him for abandoning them.

Glando stat block


You can find more unique NPCs in our Tangible Taverns and 5e NPC collections on DriveThruRPG.

Open Game License


What did you think of this NPC? Did he make an appearance in your game session? 

flawed rose

Flawed Foe: Carbid Stouthall

Some NPCs make excellent allies, others are debilitating nemeses, but some are just sad. In this series of posts we bring you Flawed Foes.  These NPCs may once have held great potential, alas, their flaws have created substantial hurdles.  Don’t let that stop you from enjoying some good old role-playing fun though!


Carbid was once a champion warrior, idolized by both young and old.  Anytime the threat of danger presented itself, Carbid was at the front line, defending his clan with gusto.  Many an enemy was slain by his hand, and numerous tales spoke of his bravery.

Over mugs of ale around the warm fires his people would feast and afterward, might pull out cards or dice and play games.  Carbid enjoyed the games immensely, and was always happy to make a wager.  He quickly developed a gambling problem, and unfortunately, did not have enough skill to back it up.  Many a bet was won against the great hero until the clan agreed betting with Carbid, and ultimately taking his money and belongings, showed great disrespect to the warrior who had saved them so many times.

Carbid often tried to convince clan members to wager with him anyway, though they always refused, prompting him to spiral into a rage.  His fellows would take cover, waiting for the anger to subside, offering him food and drink and other means of placating him.

Publisher's Choice Quality Stock Art ©Rick Hershey/Fat Goblin Games

Publisher’s Choice Quality Stock Art ©Rick Hershey/Fat Goblin Games (https://fatgoblingames.com/)

One day Carbid was travelling with a few of his clansmen when they came to rest in a tavern a few days journey from their home. It was here he joined a game of cards, against the wishes of his fellows. The game started well enough, and Carbid, excited at the opportunity to gamble, continued to play hand after hand.  His opponent quickly turned the tables on him, taking all of Carbid’s valuables in two hands.  Certain he could get them back, Carbid begged for one more hand.  With nothing physical to offer, the stranger asked for a single favour.  Carbid hastily agreed. And lost. With nary a copper to his name, and a favour owed, the dwarf walked away, head low.

The next morning, he and his clansmen were set to return home when the stranger beckoned Carbid over and called in the favor.  He asked Carbid to travel east to a nearby lake, defeat the ogre that resides in a cave there, and return with the head.  Carbid was eager to return to his people, but he knew he had to stand by his promise. Enlisting the help of his fellows, Carbid set off.  The trip took several days, thought the creature was easy enough to locate and defeat.  The party returned triumphant a week after they had departed from the tavern.  The stranger was not there, but upon inquiring, Carbid was given a note of thanks.

A bit perplexed, Carbid disposed of the head and, with his allies, set off for home.  What they found was a grave sight; their clan hold had been burned and the residents slaughtered.  The stranger had set them up, eager to have the bravest warriors occupied while he lay waste to the settlement.

Carbid’s companions were furious. Carbid was devastated.

Now haunted by his actions, Carbid travels alone with inferior quality weapons, spending every copper he has on liquor in the hopes of drowning away his sorrows.  Carbid suffers from horrific nightmares, causing him to feel tired even after what most would consider to be a restful night’s sleep.

Carbid Stat Block


You can find more unique NPCs in our Tangible Taverns and 5e NPC collections on DriveThruRPG.

Open Game License


What did you think of this NPC? Did he make an appearance in your game session? 

5 Thoughts on Volo’s Guide to Monsters

In November, Wizards of the Coast unleashed Volo’s Guide to Monsters, a combination monster ecology lorebook, bestiary, and, just for fun, they tossed a chapter on new player races in. Since I’m perpetually behind the times (I like call myself a late adopter), I have only recently come to possess a copy of this tome. My first impressions follow: Continue reading 5 Thoughts on Volo’s Guide to Monsters

Freebie Friday: 5e NPC – Deloris Franz (Part Two)

Last week we gave you sneak peek at Deloris Franz, an antogonist from 5e NPCs: Bullies and Brutes.  We know detailed histories and motivations are awesome, but since Deloris is intended to be used in an RPG, stat blocks are handy too, right?

deloris-finalThat’s why this week we bring you her complete stat block.  If you are intrigued and think a few more unique NPCs could be benefical to you in your game, we entreat you to pick up the brand new release from Dire Rugrat Publishing. Continue reading Freebie Friday: 5e NPC – Deloris Franz (Part Two)

Freebie Friday: 5e NPC – Deloris Franz (Part One)

This coming Wednesday, January 18th, Dire Rugrat Publishing is releasing 5e NPCs: Bullies & Brutes.  With nearly 40 pages of unique stat blocks, write-ups, and colour art, there’s plenty of NPC goodness. While all of the characters in the book are a bully of some sort, some prefer brawn and others brain; challenges range from 1/2 to 15.

To tide you over until the big release, here’s a sneak peek: Continue reading Freebie Friday: 5e NPC – Deloris Franz (Part One)

jar of dice

5 and 5 for D&D 5e

The newest edition of Dungeons & Dragons may not have that new game scent anymore, but over a year of regular play has done a lot to display its virtues and vices to me. Before we get to the five things I like most and least about the game, I’ll provide a bit of background.

I was all set to ignore 5e (still being called D&D Next at the time), and paid no attention to the public playtest. My fantasy RPG itch was being scratched by Pathfinder, after all, and really, could any game dethrone Second Edition AD&D as my favourite fantasy RPG of all time? But 5e was released, and it got a lot of positive attention… and my mother, the person that got me the Mentzer Basic Set for my eighth birthday and set off a lifetime love of RPGs, gifted me with the Player’s Handbook, Dungeon Master’s Guide, and Monster Manual… so I gave it a shot. And I’m glad I did.

That out of the way, let’s get to five things I really like about 5e:

  1. Advantage/Disadvantage. More than anything, I love advantage and disadvantage, and their lack of absolute codification. Replacing the horde of small bonuses, and especially bonus types, used in D&D 3rd edition (and its derivatives) and 4th edition with this simple rule was genius.
  2. Spellcasting. Spells that scale based on the level of spell slot being used is a thing that should have been done several editions ago. Thankfully it’s a thing now. Further, rituals are back from 4th edition. This is a good thing.
  3. Concentration. More to the point, that many buffing spells require concentration, meaning that a caster can only have one in effect at a time. Gone are the suites of buffs players cast before every encounter. Good riddance.
  4. Return of the horde. The so-called “bounded accuracy” that 5e is based around means that low challenge threats are still threats far into a character’s adventuring career. My players, with 6th level characters, are still struggling against the mobs of low challenge mooks that amass around the big bad guys and gals. That’s right, mobs. I can use tons of enemies because of…
  5. Quick combat. Combat is resolved relatively quickly in 5e. Much more quickly than in 3rd or 4th edition, certainly. I like this, it means I can run two or even three combats in a three to four hour session but still have time for exploration and role-play. Wins all around.Paizo goblin

Lots to like, right? All is not sunshine and unicorns however, as the next five points will detail. Without further ado, five things I dislike about 5th edition…

  1. Tieflings, and drow, and dragonborn… Oh my! Call me stodgy, but I don’t think these three races… well, two races and a subrace… should be part of the core game. Of course, if my players would let me, I would disallow every non-human race in my games…
  2. Short adventures. Where are they? The campaign length hardbacks are nice, for the most part, but 5e suffers from a dearth of short adventures. Sure, I can and do convert adventures from previous editions, but come on, The Lost Mine of Phandelver from the Basic Game is a fantastic, sandboxy short adventure… I’d like to see more in that vein.
  3. Dying. By the gods it’s difficult to kill a character in 5e. But the characters get dropped to death saves, often multiple times in an encounter as their companions bring them back to consciousness. It’s silly.
  4. Encounter design. One of the best aspects of 4th edition was the ease with which a DM could put together an encounter. With 5e’s lighter engine, I was expecting that it would be even easier to design exciting encounters. My expectations were in vain; 5e is more difficult to generate encounters for than both 3rd and 4th editions. This is exacerbated by…
  5. Creature creation. Unlike the previous two editions, 5e doesn’t do a very able job of explaining how to create monsters, and more importantly in my opinion, npcs. There’s a table of benchmarks creatures should meet… but special features are not addressed in any meaningful way. Please, design team, give us something better.

So there they are: five and five. Have you been playing D&D 5e? Why or why not? What are your likes and dislikes?