Moar Goblins: Exploring the Pukwudgie

Gob·lin /ɡäblən/

noun

A mischievous, ugly, dwarflike creature of folklore.


Once upon a time, these creatures went by many other names.

Elf. Gnome. Imp. Orc. Brownie. Troll. Puck. Redcap. Ogre.

They were antagonists of myth and fable. The subject of cautionary tales parents would tell their children to encourage common sense and good behaviour. They were the face of humanity’s collective fear of the unknown. They were feared and respected.

Goblins’ folkloric qualities have been stripped away from them in the world’s oldest roleplaying game. The aspects that have made them mythic across the vast and varied tapestry of human culture have been stripped away and granted to other creatures, leaving the poor goblin a pathetic, sniveling servitor to creatures that carry the names that were once synonymous with goblin. First level adventurers kill these pathetic excuses for goblinkind by the score before moving on to bigger challenges. No one fears goblins anymore. No one respects them.

Moar Goblins

Dire Rugrat Publishing aims to change that with Moar Goblins, which features a sextet of goblinoids adapted from a variety of real-world cultures.

  • Grindylows – aquatic scavengers and terrors of the deep.
  • Gudro Bonga – sometimes benevolent creatures often mistaken for children.
  • Kallikantzaroi – weird, yule ruining goblins obsessed with the destruction of the World Tree.
  • Nacht Kabouters – red hat wearing mischief makers that travel by night.
  • Pukwudgies – forest dwellers with a kinship to hedgehogs.
  • Tokoloshe – vicious child stealers and vengeance takers.

With challenges ranging from ½ to 6, Moar Goblins will keep adventurers busy into the middle of their career, and hopefully rebuild some of the respect goblins have lost over the course of five editions.

Moar Goblins (A Mini Bestiary) was released on DriveThruRPG last week.  We love our blog readers, so we’re sharing a sample of one of the goblin variants below.


Pukwudgie

Pukwudgies reside in moderate climates, typically near wooded areas with fresh sources of water. If left to themselves, or occasionally gifted with offerings, pukwudgies refrain from interfering in the lives of those in the area.

pukwudgieGoblinoids. Pukwudgies were once friendly, helpful goblinoids, but their inability to share a language with and understand the ideals of those they attempted to befriend and aid resulted in many of their efforts backfiring. Over time, the creatures were viewed as a nuisance and, feeling unappreciated, the pukwudgies decided to torment those who tried to exclude them and treated them like inferior beings.

Growing Resentment. The less appreciated a pukwudgie feels, the more malicious it becomes. Harmful pranks, missing items and eventually disappearing children are not uncommon in areas with tribes of pukwudgies that believe they are mistreated by humanoids.

Skilled Hunters. Pukwudgies are capable hunters. Living off the land, they are adept at navigating the wilderness. They are also proficient with poison and often dress their arrows with it to take down those who dare trespass into their territory.

Magical Aptitude. Drawing on their bond with nature, pukwudgies have some facility with magic, including the ability to take on the form on a porcupine.


Two stat blocks accompany this variant in Moar Goblins, offering a lower level pukwudgie as well as the more capable pukwudgie shaman.

Pick up your copy of Moar Goblins today and, (bonus!) if you use this link you can pick it up for just $1.50! 

5 Thoughts on Volo’s Guide to Monsters

In November, Wizards of the Coast unleashed Volo’s Guide to Monsters, a combination monster ecology lorebook, bestiary, and, just for fun, they tossed a chapter on new player races in. Since I’m perpetually behind the times (I like call myself a late adopter), I have only recently come to possess a copy of this tome. My first impressions follow: Continue reading 5 Thoughts on Volo’s Guide to Monsters

5 Times A Favorite Show Referenced Dungeons & Dragons

I have only been gaming for a few years, which is a drop in the bucket compared to many gamers. In times past, before I met my husband, references to RPGs in my favorite TV shows went virtually undetected; the witty banter continued, the scene changed, or it went over my head. After I met my husband and learned a bit about his hobby, I would roll my eyes at the references, or tell my husband x show mentioned his favorite hobby, so, you know, it isn’t all bad and maybe he could watch it with me.

Once I picked up a handful of dice and embraced my inner geek, I started getting a thrill out of the references. They were a nod to my new hobby, a secret shared between me and a favorite show.

And there are loads of references out there. RPGs, especially Dungeons and Dragons, have a huge following, and a broad range of fans. And it isn’t like we all sit around in our basement living in an imaginary world where we pretend to be high level wizards (not all day, every day anyway – sometimes we might go for a fighter!)  We are often functioning members of society with jobs, families, responsibilities and commitments.

Either to appeal to us, or because TV show creators, producers and writers love RPGs like we do (and might also break out the dice during their time away from the studio) references to this beloved hobby show up now and then. Recently, Netflix released Stranger Things, a show that starts with a group of young boys playing Dungeons & Dragons. Numerous references are made throughout the season, and even non-RPGers would be hard pressed to miss the big nods to the geeky hobby.  The cult-classic Community spent a whole episode following the college students as they explored the adventures fellow student and Dungeon Master Abed had in store for them. There are numerous other shows, some of which seem more likely than others, that pay homage to the beloved game, so without further ado:

Here 5 D&D references from some of my favorite shows:

  1. Veronica Mars

    2.13 “Ain’t No Magic Mountain High Enough”

    Dick: “I think he took Ghost World up to his room. They’re probably up there making love. Or playing Dungeons and Dragons. Or both, at the same time.”

    BONUS? They did it more than once.

    2.04 “Green Eyed Monster”
    Jackie to Wallace

    Jackie: “Get back ladies; he’s mine! You really are a basketball star, aren’t you? I mean I’m not just smacking the ass of some Dungeons and Dragons geek, right?”

     

  2. Supernatural

    7.20  “The Girl with the Dungeons and Dragons Tattoo”

    The RPG in question is not just referenced in the title of this episode; just as Charlie, a computer hacker who stumbles into the world of weird, thinks she has broken the password, a voice taunts her with “Nice try Zero Charisma.”

     

  3. Gilmore Girls

    2.13. “A-Tisket A-Tasket”

    Lorelai begs Luke, the local diner owner to jump in and save her from being set up with one of several random suitors during a picnic basket auction. When he wins her basket, she calls out: “Sorry guys, don’t feel bad; I’m totally into Dungeons and Dragons.”

     

  4. The Simpsons

    3.5 “Homer Goes to College”

    Homer: “We played Dungeons and Dragons for three hours, and then I was slain by an elf.”

  5. Buffy the Vampire Slayer

    7.22 “Chosen”

    Giles: “I was a highly respected watcher, and now I’m a wounded dwarf with the mystical strength of a doily.”

What show have you seen that referenced D&D (or another RPG)? Share in the comments below!

jar of dice

5 and 5 for D&D 5e

The newest edition of Dungeons & Dragons may not have that new game scent anymore, but over a year of regular play has done a lot to display its virtues and vices to me. Before we get to the five things I like most and least about the game, I’ll provide a bit of background.

I was all set to ignore 5e (still being called D&D Next at the time), and paid no attention to the public playtest. My fantasy RPG itch was being scratched by Pathfinder, after all, and really, could any game dethrone Second Edition AD&D as my favourite fantasy RPG of all time? But 5e was released, and it got a lot of positive attention… and my mother, the person that got me the Mentzer Basic Set for my eighth birthday and set off a lifetime love of RPGs, gifted me with the Player’s Handbook, Dungeon Master’s Guide, and Monster Manual… so I gave it a shot. And I’m glad I did.

That out of the way, let’s get to five things I really like about 5e:

  1. Advantage/Disadvantage. More than anything, I love advantage and disadvantage, and their lack of absolute codification. Replacing the horde of small bonuses, and especially bonus types, used in D&D 3rd edition (and its derivatives) and 4th edition with this simple rule was genius.
  2. Spellcasting. Spells that scale based on the level of spell slot being used is a thing that should have been done several editions ago. Thankfully it’s a thing now. Further, rituals are back from 4th edition. This is a good thing.
  3. Concentration. More to the point, that many buffing spells require concentration, meaning that a caster can only have one in effect at a time. Gone are the suites of buffs players cast before every encounter. Good riddance.
  4. Return of the horde. The so-called “bounded accuracy” that 5e is based around means that low challenge threats are still threats far into a character’s adventuring career. My players, with 6th level characters, are still struggling against the mobs of low challenge mooks that amass around the big bad guys and gals. That’s right, mobs. I can use tons of enemies because of…
  5. Quick combat. Combat is resolved relatively quickly in 5e. Much more quickly than in 3rd or 4th edition, certainly. I like this, it means I can run two or even three combats in a three to four hour session but still have time for exploration and role-play. Wins all around.Paizo goblin

Lots to like, right? All is not sunshine and unicorns however, as the next five points will detail. Without further ado, five things I dislike about 5th edition…

  1. Tieflings, and drow, and dragonborn… Oh my! Call me stodgy, but I don’t think these three races… well, two races and a subrace… should be part of the core game. Of course, if my players would let me, I would disallow every non-human race in my games…
  2. Short adventures. Where are they? The campaign length hardbacks are nice, for the most part, but 5e suffers from a dearth of short adventures. Sure, I can and do convert adventures from previous editions, but come on, The Lost Mine of Phandelver from the Basic Game is a fantastic, sandboxy short adventure… I’d like to see more in that vein.
  3. Dying. By the gods it’s difficult to kill a character in 5e. But the characters get dropped to death saves, often multiple times in an encounter as their companions bring them back to consciousness. It’s silly.
  4. Encounter design. One of the best aspects of 4th edition was the ease with which a DM could put together an encounter. With 5e’s lighter engine, I was expecting that it would be even easier to design exciting encounters. My expectations were in vain; 5e is more difficult to generate encounters for than both 3rd and 4th editions. This is exacerbated by…
  5. Creature creation. Unlike the previous two editions, 5e doesn’t do a very able job of explaining how to create monsters, and more importantly in my opinion, npcs. There’s a table of benchmarks creatures should meet… but special features are not addressed in any meaningful way. Please, design team, give us something better.

So there they are: five and five. Have you been playing D&D 5e? Why or why not? What are your likes and dislikes?