What’s in the Bag?

Ah, that moment when your players take down an NPC wealthy enough to possess a bag of holding. They want it to store their own goods, sure, but it didn’t come empty now, did it?

This series of posts detail the contents of such magical bags.


An Infernal Commander’s Bag of Holding

The edges of this meticulously clean bag are trimmed in a fine red ribbon.  The initials “RY” have been embroidered near the opening of the bag.

  • An unholy text
  • 25 gp
  • Black vestments for an infernal church
  • 5 candles
  • 3 vials of unholy water
  • A wicker basket with a handle
  • Patchouli oil
  • A series of unsent letters to “Father” signed “RY”
  • Family signet
  • Potion of healing
  • Case of 10 crossbow bolts
  • Silver whistle
  • Boot polish
  • Whip

Travels in “Uncharted” Lands

So often we think of adventurers wandering vast swathes of unclaimed lands. They find somewhere to set their bedrolls, maybe a tent, and set watches for the night. If they are reasonable survivalists they might forage for berries or root vegetables, perhaps hunt some game or set snares.

Only, how much land is truly unclaimed?

Has the land long been home to a tribe of nomadic ogres? Is there a hill giant homestead? Is there a village some miles away where the local earl may not appreciate people poaching on the land? Perhaps the patch of berries the adventurer’s found is a food source a local farmer relies on to feed his family.

This blog series provides encounters for your PCs, and an opportunity for them to consider is uncharted land really uncharted?

Ogres in the Mountains

Some distance from a small village, a tribe of ogres has made their home. Four of these hulking giants live inside a vast cave tucked into the bottom of a mountain. Some people from the village have noticed them in the distance and worry about their own safety, and that of their fellows. The PCs are asked to venture forth, exterminate the foul beasts, and save the village.

Complications

A homestead some distance from the village has been relying on the hunting the ogres do.  The local wolf population had grown substantially and threatened the livelihood of the farmers.  Their sheep have fared much better in recent years as the ogres have been attacking the wolves. If the ogres are killed, the farmer and his family fear the wolf population will once again surge, and they and their sheep will be in danger.

The ogres, while quick to temper, are relatively peaceful. They mean the village no harm, and are trying to live symbiotically with the locals.

Lord Alvin Cyris

old fashioned book with a house shield of a black elk on a green and white background

We are pleased to release Houses and Heraldry.

This book sketches out ten noble houses for your campaign. Each house is laid out on one page; the top half contains the house name, its motto, a representation of their heraldic device as it would appear on a shield, and an information block detailing important personages, numbers of troops, and vassal houses. The lower portion provides enough detail about the interesting characters of the house to get your imagination going, but leaves plenty of room for you to add your own details.

The younger son of Duke Cyris is getting ready to branch out on his own. The exclusive blog content below details his family, servants and vassal houses.

Pick up your copy today on DriveThruRPG.


House Cyris

Steady On, A Dragon’s Dawn

 

Lord of House: Lord Alvis Cyris

Spouse: Lady Julianna Cyris (formerly Houghton)

Children: Jarle (son), Raoul (son)

Household Knights, Retainers, Servants: Hal Wainwright (butler), Fiona Wainwright (head housekeeper)

Bannermen: 425 (300 infantry [50 immediately available]; 100 archers [10 immediately available]; 25 personal guard)

Vassal Houses: House Houghton

 

Lord Alvis Cyris is the younger son of Duke Azin Cyris. His title is technically a courtesy title, though he does hold a small parcel of land his father his given him in the family’s duchy. The younger Lord Cyris is quickly securing relationships with other noble houses, and solidifying ones with House Drekyn, the family his mother was born to. He has recently revealed his family crest, which is an amalgamation of his father’s banner with his mother’s.

Lord Alvis Cyris
Alvis is a canny young man who aspires to lead House Cyris upon his father’s death. With his wife Julianna’s support, Alvis is gaining favor and support from his family’s vassal houses, and nobles further afield. Alvis is an accomplished duellist, and has taught his wife how to defend herself. He has a tactical mind, and understands the politics of nobility well.

Lady Julianna Cyris
Lady Cyris was born into a family with strong ties to House Drekyn. When a marriage between her and a grandson of House Drekyn was suggested, her family eagerly accepted. Lady Cyris has been well taught in arts of manipulation and subterfuge, and is eager to see her family rise to great heights. She is working closely with her husband to manufacture a series of events that would see them inherit all of House Cyris.

Jarle Cyris
A short, stocky boy nearing ten years of age, Jarle is already being groomed as the future head of the house. He is often present at his father’s meetings, listening quietly. Afterward, his father quizzes him on what was discussed, ensuring his son pays attention to every detail. He understands how to use various weapons and trains with them each day. He is also very well educated, and is encouraged to spend at least an hour of each day reading books he borrows from his grandfather’s library.

Raoul Cyris
Slighter than his older brother, Raoul is a charming eight-year-old with a cheeky smile and large blue eyes. He is quickly becoming a capable swordsman. He despises his studies, which causes them to drag on longer than he or his tutor wish them to.

Hal and Fiona Wainwright
A serious faced couple in their younger years, Hal and Fiona work as the heads of staff for Lord and Lady Cyris. Hal is the son of Herbert Wainwright, House Drekyn’s dedicated and loyal butler. While he worked for some time at the Drekyn estate, Duchess Gunnilda Cyris requested he relocate from her old family home and become the butler for her youngest son. He was honoured to do so, and arrived with his wife. The two have no children, and have been unable to conceive any. They are loyal to Lord and Lady Cyris, but also to Duchess Gunnilda Cyris and House Drekyn.

 

Pick up your copy of Houses and Heraldry for 5e on DriveThruRPG.

If you don’t think you want the five 5e stat blocks, there is also a system neutral version.

Download a PDF copy of the above. 

Sewing with Kids – Charm Class

I’ve worked on a few sewing projects with the kids, and they have enjoyed some more than others. With all of the hearts in the windows, I thought I’d use up some of the felt from our pig project.

I did this simple project with Rugrat #2 and Rugrat #3. (Rugrat #1 was happily working on something else.)

Spread the Love

  1. Cut out a heart shape from two pieces of felt. It’s easiest to use one heart as the template for the other. Folding the felt in half to make the two sides even makes things easier as well.

  2. Thread embroidery floss into a needle, stitch 3/4 of the way around. Leave enough space to stuff it. We used different stitching on some of the hearts, but the easiest was the whip stitch. I helped a fair bit with this part.


  3. Stuff the heart. The kids loved this part, and I didn’t need to help at all.

  4. Finish stitching. Close the hole up.

  5. Add a little bit of embroidery floss to the top to hang it from. Then simply hang it from a tree or a window.

Sewing with Kids – Jillian Jiggs Pigs

A long time ago, when I was a child

I sat alone reading while my sister went wild

Paper bag princesses, a jolly postman, and Jillian Jiggs

Oh how I desperately wanted my own little pigs

The cover of the Wonderful Pigs of Jillian Jiggs

 

For years a kept a little pig my mum made me. It had never turned out quite how I wanted it, but it was made for me. And then a couple of years ago Rugrat #3 got her hands on it and the poor little thing was never the same.

Around this time I stumbled on Jillian Jiggs. I came across her in a local consignment store and was thrilled. I brought the book home and read it to my Rugrats, only to discover for all the talk of pigs, the darn instructions weren’t there. I started to think my memory of the whole thing was wrong, but after some hunting I discovered Jillian had more than one book. And why wouldn’t she? If you haven’t heard of these books, or haven’t looked closely at the art, I recommend you do. The attention to detail is great and so much fun. The rhyming scheme of the book also makes it a pleasure to read out-loud.

After some hunting, I found the instructions in the back of The Wonderful Pigs of Jillian Jiggs, which I also picked up secondhand.

I had been meaning to make these pigs with my own kids, but excuses.

Last week, just before Spring Break, I walked into Rugrat#2’s room and my jaw dropped. The state of of it was something else.

It was like a bomb had gone off.

A bomb filled with Lego, bits of paper and who only knows what else. 

Without even thinking I started to recite the words of Jillian Jiggs’ mother. And he stared at me blankly.

I dropped everything, found the books on his shelf and read the first one right then and there. He laughed and smiled and loved it.

And so I read all about her wonderful pigs. We looked at the collection of pigs in the pages. We talked about what they were wearing. And we made a deal to make our own.

Transmogrification Class

We are trying really hard to make learning fun around my house in light of everything.

Today’s lesson: turning pantyhose into a pig!

It turns out this is more difficult than I thought and I see now why my mum only made one little pig for me, and not a whole pig family as I so desperately wanted.

I highly recommend starting with an easier sewing project (like this dice bag) if your kids (or husband) have very little sewing experience. 

I also suggest if you are making this for three kids, you come a little more prepared. If your family is anything like mine, there will be a lot of impatient eyes watching you.

Stuffed Sausages or Toast

My boys (Rugrat#1 and Rugrat#2) laughed and laughed that the stockings looked more like food than pigs. Rugrat#1 insists his looks like a stuffed sausage (prompting a conversation on what sausages are made of!). Rugrat#2 says his looks like over cooked toast.

Rugrat#1 adding the stuffing to his pig

There was lots of laughter.

I loved that. But it didn’t last. 

a button nose on the first pig

This ended up being a two day project. By the end of Day One we closed off one end of our pantyhose, picked out buttons for our pig noses and I managed to get the noses on and the eyes made.

In the end, the eyes were a bit of a piece of embroidery thread pulled through and just tied than a french knot. 

Partially made pigs

 

Then they sat there. 

When I say “2 day project” I don’t mean one day, and then the next. Life got busy.

Teachers sent learning packages.

The house got messy.

I started rage cleaning.

The kids got distracted with screens.

My day job needed attention.

I had writing assignments due.

March turned to April, and that turned to June. But eventually…

“Day Two” came

We sorted through the pile of square felt I picked up on Amazon, and each of the rugrats chose their own ear colour. Once it was selected, I cut the ears into square shapes and sewed them on. I tried to encourage the kids to help with this part, but honestly, the project was a bit more than they wanted. They alternated between watching me and wandering off to play/find a snack/make a mess/frustrate a sibling. 

After stitching on the ears we realized we’d sadly missed adding the mouth the “previous day.” So we took care of that, and tied the ends of the stocking up into a little tail.

Make sure you squeeze and moving the stuffing where you want it first, and ensure it is as full as you want it to be. On the first try we had a sad underfed little pig and one that was a bit overstuffed due to which part of the stocking was used.  

The feet were probably my least favorite part. By now I was also done with the so called “wonderful” pigs. We sat down for a family movie night and I stitched away, making 20 sets of little pig feet. 

Eventually, the little pigs were done. 

Here they are, looking pretty cute.

Rugrat #3 picked out a broken hair clip to adorn her pig with. We cut the flower off the broken clip and stitched it onto the side of her head.

Rugrat #1 and Rugrat #2 wanted their little pigs just plain.

And Ken and I were so relieved to be done with this, plain was find with us.

I learned why I only ever had one wonderful pig

And I vaguely recall being as impatient as the rugrats were.  So a big thank you to my mum. 

I hope, in time, the rugrats look back on this somewhat successful sewing project fondly. I know they loved the end result. Rugrat #2 loved his so much he pulled the stocking. (I managed to stitch it back together, but the poor thing looks like he suffered a serious battle wound, or had his spleen removed in the 90’s.)

If, after this defeating tale, you are eager to try to make your own wonderful pigs, I present the instructions.

Make Your Own Pigs

Transmogrification or An Eggs-periment

Public schools are still closed, and parents are doing what they can to keep their kids engaged and learning. Some teachers are sending out activities, others are still putting lessons together.

Cover of Science in A Bag by Sandra Markle

We’ve been incorporating some of the ideas we are being sent, but with the age range in our house doing three sets of learning activities can be tough. We’re working through fun activities and trying to bring the learning in: fractions with breadmaking; the concept of diffusion with coloured ice cubes melting in water; hand-eye coordination (and a useful life skill) with sewing dice bags; and playing lots of RPGs because fun!

We’ve taken our potions classes up a notch by combining our lessons on diffusion with some of our other potions lessons.

Removing the Shell From an Egg

I have this book from when I was a kid. It is called Science in a Bag and it’s by Sandra Markle. It’s full of science experiments you can do in a bag. One of them, and my favorite of the bunch, is removing an egg shell.

You fill a bag with vinegar and then add an egg. The acidic nature of the vinegar slowly dissolves the calcium carbonate on the egg.  The kids loved looking at the bubbles that formed on the outside of the shell. We watched it for a few days, and then I washed the egg off in the sink.

The membrane around the egg stays intact, and if you hold it up to the light you can see the yolk. The Rugrats loved touching the shell-less egg. (If you do this, be gentle! Several years ago Rugrat #1 actually popped one.)

An egg without its shell

Shrinking an Egg

So part two of this is new to us. We learned in an earlier experiment about diffusion. Removing an egg shell allowed us to understand membranes.

This part of the experiment allows us to understand diffusion and membranes together.

We took our clean egg (without its shell) and put it into a clean plastic bag. Then we filled the egg with clear corn syrup. The liquid in the egg can pass through the egg’s membrane, but the syrup can’t. In time it shrinks the egg!

Me: Isn’t that weird?

Rugrat#1: Not really. It’s science.

an egg without its shell, and missing some of the liquid inside

Disclaimer: If the shell-less egg weirds you out, this will not be easy for you.

The yolk becomes more visible and the membrane gets loose, like a half empty sack.

It’s like a bag! – Rugrat#3

Growing an Egg

Once we let the egg shrink down, we cleaned it off in water. The Rugrats got to poke at it and touch it.

Then we placed what remained of the egg back into a plastic bag of water and let it sit overnight. Since water can pass through the membrane the size of the egg started to grow.

Rugrat#3 pondered if the shell would grow back. Her brothers explained that wasn’t possible, and we discussed the dissolving of the shell again.

an egg without its shell, reinflated

The egg quickly plumped back up. The liquid inside was strange and we could see things floating in it. After a good feel of it, we disposed of the egg and washed our hands thoroughly.

 

Illusions with Kids

Everyone seems to be offering free or discounted classes right now. I don’t have extra time because three kids at home full time, but hey, that’s okay. I still found this go at your own pace video based class. It’s called ‘The Science of Well Being’ and is touted as a Yale class being offered through Coursera. It’s been one night, so I’m not going to get into that, but there was this great bit about the GI Joe Fallacy.

Knowing is Half the Battle

She explains that, in the 80’s GI Joe cartoon there were public service announcements at the end of each episode. At the end of them, the kid would thank the GI Joe who delivered the PSA, and he or she would say “Knowing is half the battle.”

Professor Laurie Santos disagrees, saying that just because we know something, doesn’t mean we apply it.

Then she showed some optical illusions. The first one was the Muller-Lyer illusion. It looks like this:

Muller-Lyer illusion

So the question is: which line appears longer?  The top one.

Seeing is Believing

Look closely. They are the same length.

Muller-Lyer illusion

Even when we know this, the top one still appears longer.

Professor Laurie Santos goes on to explain our own thought patterns aren’t as easy as we think.

Seeing isn’t always believing.

And knowing isn’t always half the battle.

Practice Makes Perfect

Practice doesn’t make perfect. It makes better.

I saw this as a great opportunity to teach the Rugrats how to question what they see, even if they see it with their own eyes.

For today’s class at the College of Very Interesting Disciplines, we talked about illusions!

I likened this to their first class of illusion magic. The second class is coming soon and we’re all excited about it (shadow puppets!).

We looked at the Muller-Lyer illusion above first. Rugrat#1 had seen it before, so I learned they do cover this in school, at at least one of his teachers did.

Duck or Bunny?

Then we took a look at this one:

duck or bunny illusion

Do you see a duck? Or a bunny?

All of the Rugrats said a duck, even though I held it as a bunny at first.

Rugrat#1 had seen this before, so he found both of them, but he still defaulted to the duck first.

Two Faces or a Pedestal?

pedestal or people illusion

So, Rugrat#1 called this a gauntlet. He meant goblet, but either way, I love he knows those words. This led to a great talk about both of those items.

Everyone saw the pedestal first in my house.

Triangle

This illusion lets us see how our mind can fill in a blank space.

triangle illusion

There is not actually a white triangle there.

Now, oddly, my Rugrats started counting out a ton of triangles, seeing each point as its own triangle because of the other triangle intercepting it.

Two Faced

The last illusion we looked at was this one.

two faced illusion

There is a young women and an old crone in this image, depending on how you look at it.

Ken taught us all this one is the trickiest of them all. He has never been able to see either face in the image.

The Rugrats worked together to try to find the faces, and they all claim to be able to see them.

How’d You Do?

I hope you had some fun exploring illusions. If you did, share them with someone else stuck at home. Then use these skills!

And as a bonus:

“Imagine Everyone is a Vampire”

A friend of mine said this recently and I think it’s important. Don’t scare the kids with this one, but practice this “illusion” for yourself.

Stay inside.

Don’t let anyone into your home.

Don’t get too close to anyone.

The sooner we can all properly practice social distancing and stay isolated as much as possible, the sooner we can flatten the curve!

Tavern Shots: Gumption

You are a rockin’ GM.

You’ve nailed the voices, the descriptions, and general atmosphere.

Or maybe you haven’t.

Or you want a little inspiration tonight because it’s been a long day.

Check out our tavern shots and get a quite glimpse through the window at life inside our taverns.

Today We Explore Gumption 

Where: Middle of Nowhere

Located far away from just about anything, this strange little homestead is a haven for weary travellers who manage to stumble upon it. Originally made viable by a druid, this oasis in now home to a halfling and two adopted human children who work the land and help out those who pass through. With no nearby neighbours, some of them are a little starved for attention, while others are leery of strangers. 

If your PCs are wandering the barren lands of the Wasted Waste, the demon ravaged landscapes near the Worldwound, or another seemingly endless uninhabitable terrain, break up their travels with a stay at Gumption. 

Who: Faces of the Tavern

Harbrum

A friendly halfling who has lived here almost his whole life, Harbrum is happy to give visitors a good meal and a safe place to sleep for the night. He works hard and believes others should do the same. He is also remarkably knowledgeable about waterfowl, especially ducks

Bill

A young, hardworking adolescent, Bill aspires to be a brave, kindhearted adventurer in his adult years. He is eager to learn from competent travellers, but wary of those who seem cruel or menacing. He would make an excellent apprentice, if someone could convince him to leave the farm. 

Magenta

A talkative young girl, Magenta is more than competent in the kitchen and has a special way with animals, especially “Buck” the resident horse. She is eager for any information from outside of the valley and could be considered something of a gossip. She seems to know everything that happens in and around Gumption. 

“Buck”

Lost and abandoned after his caravan was attacked by bandits, Stanley found himself wandering the barren land around the valley. By chance he was taken in by the dryad who made the valley what it is today, and he hasn’t strayed far since, doing all he can to care for the land and the people who reside there peacefully.  This majestic horse is more than what he seems, a secret he shares with only other one resident of the valley.

What: Stuff For Your Players to Explore

Each of our taverns includes a table of rumours and a table of events, giving you quick ideas to feed to your players. From animals in labour, corpses found nearby, and a kidnapped child there is something for every PC to show off their skills with.

In the short piece below, we introduce a mysterious traveller. Just what does he have in store for the caretakers of Gumption? And can your PCs arrive in time to stop him? 

Pick up your copy of Gumption today.


A Shot of Gumption

“What are you doing, boy?” asked Harbrum, lifting his straw hat to wipe his brow.

The horse just stared at him, refusing to move from the hay bale.

“It’s time to go inside,” he said, turning from the horse. “The other animals are settled in. Am I putting you in the barn for the night?”

The horse moved from the hay bale and blocked the man’s path.

The sun was low in the sky and Magenta had already let Harbrum know they had a visitor. He didn’t like leaving her or Bill with strangers for too long and was eager to get up to the main house and greet them. He was also getting hungry.

“Come on, Buck. We’re done for the day,” he said sighing and trying to move around the horse.

The horse blocked his path once more and neighed insistently.

Harbrum sighed.

“What do you want, Buck?” he asked, his usually cheerful demeanor starting to fade.

The horse moved to the hay bale once more.

“There’s plenty of hay in the barn,” said Harbrum distracted. “Come along. You can have some there.”

The two of them stared at each other for several moments before Harbrum threw his hands up in the air.

“I’m going inside, Buck,” he said. “We’ve got company, and we can put the hay in the barn tomorrow.”

The horse neighed in protest and moved to block Harbrum’s path once more.

“I’m going to talk to Magenta,” said Harbrum, frustrated. “Maybe she’ll know what to do with you.”

The horse moved slightly to one side, allowing the halfling to pass.

Harbrum made his way over to the main building and went in the side door. The savory smell of a well-seasoned stew met his nostrils and a smile spread across his face.

“Smells delicious!” he exclaimed to the young girl who was stirring a pot over the fire.

“Thanks, Harbrum,” she smiled, wiping her hands on her apron.

Harbrum took in the man sitting at one of the hand-crafted wooden tables. The stranger looked tired, dirty, and in need of a good meal.

“He hasn’t been any trouble?” he asked Magenta quietly while washing his hands in the basin of warm water she’d put out for him.

“No, no,” she assured him, taking a small spoonful of stew from the pot.

He nodded.

“Oh, Buck seems unhappy about something. I’m not sure what though. Refuses to go into the barn, but didn’t want me to come up here either,” Harbrum said almost absently. The good smells were already easing his mind.

Magenta frowned slightly.

“Okay, I’ll be back in a moment,” she said, disappearing through the same door he’d entered.

Harbrum made his way to the table and the man looked over at him.

“Must be the owner of this place,” he said gruffly, surveying the halfling.

“Just the caretaker,” he responded. “Dinner should be ready here shortly. You’ve already got a room for the night, have you?”

“Ay, I do,” he nodded.

Harbrum smiled at the man, and moved back toward the cooking area.

Something about the man was off-putting to him, but he wasn’t certain exactly what.

“I don’t like him,” said a young boy quietly as Harbrum stirred the pot of stew.

Bill, who had just come in from fetching a pail of water from the well, began to pull bowls off one of the shelves for the stew.

Harbrum nodded as the side door opened once more and Magenta reappeared.

“It’s going to rain,” she said, looking at Harbrum and Bill.

“Not tonight,” said Bill shaking his head.

“Put the hay in the barn,” replied Magenta softly, taking a bowl from him and filling it with stew. “Trust me.”

Harbrum sighed and, surveying the guest once more, nodded at Bill to follow him back outside.

Bill frowned, but followed hesitantly.

A small smirk crossed the face of the man at the table as the side door swung shut.

Place this tavern in your game with Tangible Taverns: Gumption.

Available now on DriveThruRPG.

Baking with Kids – It’s Bread-fast Time!

It’s a great time to get back to the basics. And lack of time doesn’t seem to be an excuse for anyone.

Back when I had but one Rugrat I’d make up loaves of fresh baked white bread. The recipe always gave me two loaves and by the time Ken got home, Rugrat#1 and I would have eaten the whole first loaf with nothing but butter. We never even made it to the table. We’d just stand or sit in the kitchen eating away.

With 3 Rugrats the home baking just doesn’t happen as much. It happens just about never. Until today.

Today’s not-homeschooling class included a lesson in baking potions. We took a table of ingredients, mixed them up, and waited to see what happened.

Grab Your Bags

I found a recipe for bread in a bag. I figured this would make the kneading process easier.

We measured out the ingredients at the table. We needed one cup of flour, so we picked out the one cup measuring scoop. Then we talked about how else we could make a cup.

Rugrat #1, who was struggling with fractions before the break, quickly caught on to what I was attempting. He demanded I stop teaching fractions. Rugrat #2 surprised me with his understanding and grasp of fractions. Rugrat #3 randomly selected spoons and cups as the answer.

Rugrat#1 hates stuff on his hands, but he had no problem adding potion ingredients to the bag and kneading the contents while they were sealed safely inside the bag.

 

kneading bread dough in a bag

 

Knead That Dough

After it sat for the ten minutes, we added the rest of the ingredients, kneaded it some more, and then tipped it out onto our table. Rugrat #2 and Rugrat #3 enjoyed this part. We had Rugrat #1 set the timer as he wanted no part of it.

kneading bread dough on a table

Then we put the bread into our pan and waited.

bread dough in the bread pan waiting for baking

Bake It Off

Once enough time had passed, we popped the loaf in the oven and waited for our potion to cook. The kids checked the oven a couple of times, ensuring not to open the door.

freshly baked bread

The recipe I used suggested 2 mini loaves, but said one loaf was fine. I don’t know if it’s my oven, which we are still getting used to after a harrowing Thanksgiving where it spat pieces of molten metal at us, the fact it should have been two mini loaves, or something else entirely, but it was not ready at the suggested time.

I think we baked our loaf for about 40 minutes total.

Eat, Eat, Eat

It’s bread-fast time! exclaimed Rugrat#2

Rugrat#3 insisted on having some left over whipping cream on her bread. Rugrat#1 went with peanut butter, a favourite of his, and Rugrat#2 figured just plain was the way to go.

Despite a few hiccups, this was a success!

whipping cream on freshly baked bread

 

a rainbow made of sparkle confetti

A Sprinkling of Magic

Social media is blowing up right with two things: updates on the Coronavirus or ways to distract yourself from the Coronavirus.

I have seen so many posts, articles, blogs, tidbits and tweets about homeschooling.

  • How to do it
  • Why not to do it
  • How to educate and teach without worrying about homeschooling
  • How much learning time you should give your kids a day
  • Samples of schedules

It goes on.

We are finding our own way, and we hope you are too.

 

Ray of Sunshine

I was taking a quick scroll through my news feed the other day when I saw a post a friend in Calgary shared.

The idea is simple: paint a rainbow and hang it in your window.

It creates an I-Spy game (or a scavenger hunt) for people out getting a bit of a fresh air. It says “Hello!” to the people you can’t be physically close to right now. And, of course, it gives the Rugrats something to do!

I shared it to our local school’s parents group and sort of waited to see what it did. It’s had a bit of pick up, and I’m excited!

We live right next to a walking and biking path, so today we made rainbows for the windows. Next week we are going to head out for a little walk (while maintaining social distancing!) and see if we can spot any rainbows.

We’re doing what we can to make the world a little brighter, and a little more magical.

one of our painted rainbows to spread the magic